Saturday, August 8, 2009

The Islander, Part II



Continuing on with yesterday's talk about the Islander, which used to be The Place to go in the summer around here, here's a shot of their boathouse.

Back in the '70's my grandmother used to pay us for collecting aluminum cans, and the Islander trash cans were always chock full. When we tired of frolicking in the pool unsupervised, we'd traipse up and down the docks rooting around in the boaters' trash. Unsupervised.

Hunting for cans gave us the opportunity to study the boats.

Some of them were the size of the QE II, enormous yachts. We imagined what it would be like to own such a vessel and spent hours pondering her name and where she would take us.

Sometimes curiosity got the best of us, particularly in this boathouse.

Since most of the boats docked here belonged to longer-term renters, there weren't as many people milling around. The owners would only occasionally be present, and it was quite easy for a curious kid or teenager to accidentally--albeit with an astonishing degree of confidence considering the circumstances--step on board and take a gander around.

Mind you, I am not saying that I did this.

All I'm saying is there were many fine vessels housed in the Islander boathouse, and it wouldn't surprise me if one or more Mathews County residents didn't set foot onto a yacht just to make sure everything was OK and the vessels were still seaworthy.

I loved the Islander.

15 comments:

Daryl said...

We really need to pool our salaries and the percent each the studio will give us as 'points' against box office receipts and buy this place .. maybe the advance from the book will do it

Reminds me of when we went to the Catskills (aka the Jewish Alps) every summer to spend 2 months in a bungalow ... there were a lot of things we did, erm, we heard was done in the barn that was on the property ..

Living on the Spit said...

I will run the front desk and co-ordinated reservations of all the guests that will want to stay with us after reading the book and seeing the movie.

Caution Flag said...

I think Marlene should be the featured chef. Imagine the profits! My job could be ... well ... I'm thinking ...

Mental P Mama said...

I'll run the gift shop.

Grandma J said...

I bet you could have a private sleepover on one of those boats.

If I close my eyes, I can see a blogfest on one of those enormous yachts. Ok...my eyes are back open.

Audrey at Barking Mad! said...

With everything going on at our place this weekend, I'm about to give Daryl's suggestion some serious consideration! Oiy!

Every once in a while Meg gets curious - way too curious - about boats that are moored at the local docks. For some reason she's become very good at being able to discern the internal luxuries from one yacht to another.

Big Hair Envy said...

**Waving my hand and volunteering to be the bartender**

Margaret Cloud said...

Still very interesting post. Sounds like a nice spot to hang around, I probably would of wondered on deck for a look see. Have a nice weekend.

mmm said...

As the former Dock Master at the Narrows Marina, should I have you arrested for boarding vessels without permission?

Chesapeake Bay Woman said...

MMM-Perhaps we can strike a deal.

After all, the Dock Master should have had all slips under control, no?

mmm said...

I was busy waiting on legitimate customers - no?

Chesapeake Bay Woman said...

At that hour of the night, I am not sure anything was legitimate.

Noe Noe Girl...A Queen of all Trades. said...

I will set up a photo booth where you can have your picture taken with the crab!

foolery said...

I'll clean the ashtrays.

Maybe.

Phyl said...

oh, oh, oh . .. can I be the lifeguard and snack bar attendant. It's really safe to combine those jobs.

Sometimes you had to board those boats. If you heard a noise, you were just making sure everything was okay. And I'm sure they would have wanted to treat you to a drink.