Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Forever Etched


I spy the door to a gorgeous old farmhouse.


I spy a beautiful etched-glass window.


This beautiful etched-glass window and the gorgeous house are part of Big Hair Envy's grandmother's place which used to be a post office back in the day--as in back in the day before our day; in other words way, way back in the day.

Pardon me while I write my acceptance speech for the Most Ridiculous Overuse of "Back in the Day" contest.

I was mesmerized by this door and its glass. As my eyes twirled like pinwheels going from one concentric circle to the next, Big Hair Envy did tell me something about it. However, due to my ADD etched-glass stupor, I failed to absorb and/or retain everything she said. What I think I heard was that they considered replacing the door and the glass but since they were unable to locate anything close to the uniquely detailed original, they decided not to mess with perfection.

Hopefully Big Hair Envy will read today and clarify the Door Story for us.

Hopefully my math teacher will never read this and question my use of the term "concentric circles, " which may or may not be what we're looking at in the design above, but which sounded right when I searched for a descriptor.

Disclaimer: Math should be outlawed was my worst subject.

I also took some shots gazing out through this glass from the interior, and they are lovely. Due to the miracle of dial-up internet, however, I don't expect to have those shots loaded until two years after Never this weekend.

Has anyone out there seen an original door like this? As many old places as I've trespassed on visited, I've never seen a window as detailed and intricate as this one.

Thanks again to BHE for the legal trespassing opportunity to visit this local treasure.

23 comments:

Diane said...

That window rocks!

Noe Noe Girl...A Queen of all Trades. said...

That design reminds me of a glass doilie. Just beautiful.
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Annie said...

I thought it must have been a lace curtain...

No I have never seen a door (well, glass panel on a door) quite like that, although I have seen many doors and houses similar.There was a house we bought many years ago when the kids were tiny, that I am reminded of!

It took my husband and his brothers about six weeks to get the house ready for us to live in. Then I had to paint it all. All while I had a tiny baby daughter. Ah, those were the days!

Mrs F with 4 said...

My grandmothers house had a tiny, tiny window with intricate etched glass that was let into the priest-hole. I seem to remember that it was about two inches square, and I was fascinated because it didn't seem to BE for anything. It wasn't as gorgeous as this one, though.

Meg @ Soup Is Not A Finger Food said...

I've never seen an etched pane in a door like that... but I do have in my kitchen, 6 antique plank-bottom chairs that have the original painting on them, and even though it's long been flaking off, my mom told me when she gave me the chairs to NEVER paint over them because they are "worth more" with the original painting. So there you have it - a valid excuse to allow something to look "aged."

Anonymous said...

Do you mean"Back In The Day" when the beer was cold the women were hot and taxes were low, or a great date was 5 trips around the 2 tasty freeze's,3 around the court house, 2 trips to old house woods,but you were to scared to get out! or "back in the day" when your mom drop you off at Donks for Saturday of great movies with your friends, you would buy JU JU bees so you could throw them at your Girlfriend just to let her know you cared( her mom would not let her sit by you), or "Back In The Day" when you carried a in your show so you could call home on a pay phone (remeber pennie loffers)When you rode your bike every where and did not have to put a lock on it.Or my favorite"Back In The Day" when the family would go to Toms Diner for a home made root beer cheese burger and fries. Now that was back in the Day!!! By the way the window is great there is a place in williamsburg that makes the design on glass using sand blasting.

Anonymous said...

sorry that should say "carry a dime in your shoe" Im going to give myself away if I keep this up!

ghostless said...

Having been an antique dealer, I can't help it, but my first reaction is, get that door off the building and in a house where it is safe and wrapped in bubble wrap. That pane of glass is probably worth thousands of dollars!!
Having said that...the photos are beautiful!
and yes, Meg, don't ever paint a true antique, it will immediately devalue it. however if you never intend on selling them, then I say paint away.
wv...adults only please....fuctor...as in the one who paints antique chairs!....honest I didn't make this wv up!!!

big hair envy said...

The story behind the door goes as such: Several years ago, my middle sister was in the process of building a new home. Since Grandma's house was falling apart, she asked if she could buy the door to put into her new home. The owners refused, and we were ALL terrified that something would happen to the glass. Dad was eventually able to purchase the home, and has secured it to the point that we no longer fear that something will happen to the glass.

It's truly a miracle that it has survived intact. The first thing Dad had to do once he bought the place was replace all of the windows. Each had been broken by vandals throwing rocks. The door pane was never touched.

Mental P Mama said...

Beautiful! And thank goodness the vandals were so--erm--nice?

Caution Flag said...

What are the plans for the door now? I wonder how old it is. You probably said, but I have a one-sentence memory capacity.

foolery said...

When my parents built their new kitchen 30 years ago, my mom had an acid-etched glass window put into the door. She loved it so much that when they built their new house, she had the etched pane removed and put into her new door at the new house. Or, BHE could have the pane removed and hung in a frame on the wall where a slammed door would not ruin your week?

It's a real treasure.

Daryl said...

Lacy ... like someone tatted that glass ...

Did you ever wonder, I didnt til just now, how tattoo became tats? Crocheting lace, tatting, the design of a tat .. okay I think I lost my caboose so lets let that train go ...

LOVE the angle of the first shot ... cousin Big Head's homestead is lovely.

WV: wooloo .. sigh, signaling me to move along .. woo loo .. you who get moving

Julie said...

Cool door and window. I have never seen one like that so thanks for sharing.

Pueblo girl said...

That door and porch are beautiful. I want....(can't be in any worse shape than my current house!)

TSannie said...

That's just beautiful! Wish that house could be fixed up - it would be so lovely.

And I'm SO with you on that math thing.

Meg at the Members Lounge said...

I cannot get over that glass. I kept thinking it was a curtain. And oh yeah, very valuable - I have never seen anything like it in the million antique shows and flea markets I've been to in New England!

Grandma J said...

Wow, what a beautiful window! If it were my grandmother's house, I'd be taking that door back to my own house!

You guys had quite the tour!

Country Girl said...

What a beautiful piece of glass. Yes, at first I thought it was a lace curtain. It must be very valuable.

Chesapeake Bay Woman said...

Thanks for commenting, everyone. The paying job is trying to kill me, so I am late and must be brief, to the extent that's possible.

First, thanks BHE for clarifying the background story. I swear I couldn't hear a word you were saying because the door is so beautiful.

And yes, to all who thought it was a lace curtain - that's exactly wht it looks like, but it's the glass. Stunning.

To Anonymous - You have described perfectly what it was like to grow up around here, although the penny loafers were just a tad before my time. I saw my first movie (Tarzan) at Donks. Most every date entailed numerous trips back and forth from Emory's to the court house. I was happy as a clam! We didn't need much more for entertainment, and if we did then there was, as you say, side trips down Haven Beach, Gwynn's Island, etc. What I wouldn't give for just one more night at Ward's Corner the way that it was. A pizza burger at Emory's (an act of congress for some ketchup); sitting in the car with the windows rolled down chatting to friends. No cares in the world.

Good times.

Bayman said...

Big Head, you may want to consider this: Buy a piece of Lexan/Pexiglass at the hardware store and cover the outside of the window, you could do both sides. You could trim it with a "picture frame" moulding. You could then see it, but it would be protected.

I replaced a couple of windows with the stuff, and it has withstood teenagers and baseballs. It is not very expensive.

Trisha said...

What a wonderful window! I can't wait to see the pictures from the inside!

becky said...

Just saw the etched glass window in the door. I would suggest the home owner take the etched glass out and have it framed. Before it gets broken. I did that with an etched window from my Grandma's house. It looks wonderful and is safe. Thanks for sharing